Fix CSS script

Thursday, March 21, 2013

Walking Dead: Prey: or Syke! Let's talk about In the Flesh instead!

Heya. Looks like I dropped the ball on writing about Prey in anything resembling a timely manner. So here's the quick and dirty about that episode: it's totally fine, and managed to get me to stop hating Andrea every minute of my life. Like Clear  two weeks before it, the focus of the episode is on a smaller group of people and actually has a coherent beginning, middle, and end. This focus had been lacking in episodes previous, and the wheeling around all over Georgia checking in with everyone dissipated the stakes. Good on them for tightening up.

Andrea also shows some competence, which we knew she must possess to survive as long as she did, but shore wasn't in evidence recently. (Although, how come she doesn't steal the Governor's car when she pulls the trick with the stairway zombies? I don't get it.) The small character work between Georgia Gandalf and Milton last week paid off in a better understood Milton - he's the one who torched the pit zombies, yeah? And altogether people seemed to have coherent actions. Neat.

But the biggest shift may be the Governor, who is *finally* acting like a really big psycho. My husband observed that he's been like this all along: telling people what they want to hear about what he's planning, and then tossing people in the "screaming pits". (Have we seen those again? Since they were first mentioned? Or is that the pit zombies?) Morrissey has a lot of presence when you get him moving - he's so damn tall, and there's this sense of inevitability when he strides around - and it was great to see that in action, especially coupled with the slightly corny but still creepy whistling.

But I come here not to talk about Walking Dead, which I apparently did anyway, but to freak out about BBC's In the Flesh, which is so amazingly good and doing just the weirdest things with zombies.


Kieren is a Partially Deceased Syndrome sufferer - god, I love these mordant acronyms I find in zombie fiction, like Colson Whitehead's PASD (Post-Apocalyptic Stress Disorder) - who has been rehabilitated from his flesh-eating state, and is preparing to be sent home to the community where he hunted and killed. His grim Northern English town is the center for the band of activist zombie hunters who helped stem the tides against the undead, and probably not that great of a place to return. Some of the townspeople came off as clumsy caricatures - and the sister rankled a bit - but lordy was that final scene with the old woman taking out her contacts and looking up at the mob come to kill her effective and brutal.

Obviously, the narrative goals of In the Flesh and Walking Dead are dissimilar, but I'm completely impressed with the way the zombie metaphor could stretch to be about rehabilitation and social conformity, disability and possibly even immigration politics. Many monster narratives end up boiling down to but the humans are the monsters OH DO YOU SEE. This is a perfectly fine stock message for justifying some bloodbath and great set-pieces, and one third season Walking Dead is relying on pretty heavily. But man is it cool when pretty much everyone is the monster, and the flinching, grainy remorse of In the Flesh really got me.

No comments:

Post a Comment